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What you’re seeing in Google’s Earth Day Doodle

On Earth Day, Google is dedicating its Doodle to how we can disrupt our beloved planet. It really is kind of a cool Doodle. Four different GIFs show a delay in the unpredictable changes caused by climate change.

From the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, you will see bright coral reefs losing their color under the weight of hot water. Coral is an organism that derives its algae color from its cells which have an asymbiotic relationship. Under pressure, including rising sea temperatures, corals lose algae in a depressing event called “bleaching

Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching in Island Lizard, Australia.  Photos were taken monthly from March to May 2016

Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching in Island Lizard, Australia. Photographs were taken monthly from March to May 2016.
GIF: Google / Marine Agency

A massive bleaching event has hit the Great Barrier Reef this year, according to the marine garden administration. March. It is one of the consequences of global warming more than 1 degree Celsius. One more degree of heat can dissolve it 99 percent of the reefs of the world. Google’s debut time shows bleaching 2016, when there was another bleach event. Photos courtesy of The Ocean Agency.

A glacier retreat at the Mount Kilimanjaro summit from December 1986 to December 2020.

A glacier retreat at the Mount Kilimanjaro summit from December 1986 to December 2020.
GIF: Google

Two other GIFs show glaciers missing from Sermersooq, Greenland, and Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania for decades. Kilimanjaro is a sleeping volcano, and is one of the top three in Africa with the highest snowfall. If those snows continue to return to their current level, they may be able to they disappear completely Within only two agreements.

Glacier retreat in Sermersooq, Greenland from December 2000 to December 2020.

Glacier retreat in Sermersooq, Greenland from December 2000 to December 2020.
Image: Google

The latest Google GIF shows forest destruction in Elend, Germany. Here, the gray corpse of dead trees has earned parts of the Harz National Park its name Harzer Silberwald, or Harz Silver Forest, according to locals. The devastation was caused by a severe drought that weakened the trees, making them vulnerable to attacks from similar ones.

Forests destroyed in Germany December 1995 to December 2020

Harz forests were destroyed in Elend, Germany from December 1995 to December 2020.
Image: Google

In the past, Google has pursued advocacy groups for climate change ads that go beyond its policy of banning misleading information. Clicking on Doodle today will lead you to the information Google has prepared for the ongoing weather crisis.